Tag Archives: inspiration

Turn-around and What Do You See?

This is brilliant!
From Jonathan Reeda, a 20 year old’s entry for a contest hosted by American Association for Retired Persons (yes I’m a member;).

Turn your speakers up, relax and enjoy the wisdom of our youth:

Learning to Walk

The video at the bottom of this post reflects (according to moi) the best of worldly family. To be born challenged as the son documented here is, into a family with a father such as he has certainly demonstrates one of good kamma, one of good worldly fortune.

Taking a second look I’m motivated by its message in an unexpected way. What will the son do should his father pass away before him? Perhaps another would step in to take his fathers place though its not very likely, and the son will certainly never be able to do on his own what he can do with his dad.

The question arose for me after Ajahn Pasanno was ‘thought’ to have the first of possibly a series of strokes (now believed to of been a one time event). What would I do should he pass away before me? Would I be able to apply his teachings and guidance without ever having contact with him again? Unlike the gentleman in the video I can learn to walk on my own and must take advantage of teachers presence to the fullest while their still alive so that when they (or myself) pass along I can remain moving forward in Dhamma.

Click HERE to view video

Meeting Ruth

Ruth Dennison whirled through the Abhayagiri Monastery in good speed and with good deed. I was lucky to have traveled the 626 southerly miles a few days earlier and hence present for Ruth’s Dhamma. I was touched by her manners, her easy courage and natural strength. There she sat in the top corner of the darkened shrine room. Candlelight emphasized a sparkling mind and wrinkled body.

Growing up I hadn’t recognize a female role model to emulate. Understandably so as few could live up to the lofty standards scripted in the Catholic publications delivered weekly in our mailbox. There were so many amazing women, all of them strong, honest and dead. It was easy to project wisdom in their silence. At six years of age I could figure it out; my family wasn’t silent, so my family wasn’t wise . . .

Ruth didn’t care when she meandered or that she would sometimes fall asleep between pauses. It was all just part of her expression, part of her truth, part of her Dhamma.
At 53 I should be able to figure this out. I met up with a female I wanted to emulate, and she wasn’t silent, and she wasn’t dead.